Places to Visit

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice – (pictured above), opened to the public on April 26, 2018, is the nation’s first memorial dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence. https://museumandmemorial.eji.org/memorial

Moton Museum – Farmville, Virginia’s former Robert Russa Moton High School, now a National Historic Landmark and museum, is the student birthplace of America’s Civil Rights Revolution. Dreamed by 16-year-old Barbara Johns, the 1951 Moton Student Strike produced three-fourths of the plaintiffs in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the landmark Supreme Court decision desegregating U.S. schools. http://www.motonmuseum.org/about/

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. https://nmaahc.si.edu/about/museum

The Virginia Museum of History & Culture launched – Unknown No Longer in 2011 to make accessible biographical details of enslaved Virginians from unpublished historical records in its collections. At the beginning of 2019, the unique content of Unknown No Longer was moved to be hosted on the Virginia Untold portal operated by the Library of Virginia, providing users with access to an expanded collection of resources for researching African American history in Virginia. https://www.virginiahistory.org/collections/unknown-no-longer-database-virginia-slave-names

Moton Museum – Virginia’s former Robert Russa Moton High School, now a National Historic Landmark and museum, is the student birthplace of America’s Civil Rights Revolution. Dreamed by 16-year-old Barbara Johns, the 1951 Moton Student Strike produced three-fourths of the plaintiffs in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the landmark Supreme Court decision desegregating U.S. schools. http://www.motonmuseum.org/about/

Historic Tredegar Museum & Tredegar History Tour – new permanent, core exhibit, A People’s Contest: Struggles for Nation and Freedom in Civil War America,features hundreds of original artifacts, dynamic theater experiences and compelling imagery.  Visitors will be able to explore, understand and feel the dramatic story of the American Civil War and its legacies.  https://acwm.org/visit-us